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Top 6 Food to Check out in Seoul

2022-12-26


Top 6 Food to Check out in Seoul


Korean BBQ | Jeongdaepo | 183-8 Dohwa-dong, Mapo-gu, Seoul


Korean barbecue refers to Korean-style meat grilling on the dinner table on either gas or charcoal grills. The most popular meat to grill is Samgyeopsal” (Pork Belly) & “Bulgogi (Beef). The meat is served plain or marinated and presented with scissors and tongs for grilling. Staple pairing for the meat is ssamjang, lettuce, rice, and garlic. There are also plenty of “banchan” or traditional side dishes that are served early on before the meat is grilled. A must-try eatery while in Seoul is going to Jeongdaepo, which was once visited by Anthony Bourdain. In Korean culture, it is customary to offer the first bite to the ones you love, so build a lettuce wrap and give them their best bite.  


Beer & Kyochon Chicken

Korea has perfected fried chicken by improving the extra crispy texture and size of bite-sized meat. With so many options out there, Kyochon has got to be on my top list of favorite fried chickens. The sauce is sweet, salty, and tangy with garlic flavors. Of course, pair it with alcohol which generally plays a large role in Korean culture. It is a fantastic combination of crispy texture, special soy sauce, cubed pickled radishes, and a cold beer. 


Bibimbap

If you have ever ridden Korean Airlines, then you have most likely tried bibimpap. It is a favorite Korean staple dish. Bibim means mixed, and bap means rice, combine the two words, and you have mixed rice. This traditional dish is a combination of a variety of vegetable ingredients, fried eggs, sesame oil, and gochujang. Koreans claim that it heals the body, releases energy, and protects against illness during winter. It is the ultimate comfort food.


Buck Wheat Noodles (Naengmyeon)

Chilled buckwheat noodle dishes are served cold and preferred during hot summer days or after a full Korean BBQ meal. The texture of the cold noodles is chewy and soaked in beef broth or radish water kimchi. The noodles can be prepared in two ways, either mul naengmyeon (water noodles) or bibim naengmyeon (mixed noodles). The noodles are made of flour and starch from buckwheat potatoes or sweet potatoes. If the noodles are mixed in a red, spicy sauce, it is called bibim naengmyeon. You also have the option to add a few squirts of vinegar or hot mustard for added flavor.  


Tteokbokki

Tteok means rice cake, and bokki means stir-fried food. Tteokbokki is a Korean favorite childhood snack sold outside by street vendors. It attracts many passersby, especially in the cold winter, and pairs well with other condiments, such as crispy fried vegetables. It has a sweet and savory taste with a bit of a spicy kick, along with a chewy texture. The dish is mixed with flat fish cake sheets and boiled eggs stir-fried in pepper paste. Sprinkling green onions on top gives off some color, making it visually appealing. 


Hotteok

Hotteok is fried dough stuffed with brown sugar or nuts. It is made from glutinous, shaped round like a mini-sized pancake. It has a chewy savory texture on the inside. They are delicious and make great hand warmers. They emerge in high numbers during winter. It is a favorite Korean winter snack, and the price ranges from 2000-2500 won. 

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